Let’s Talk – Taking care of your mental, physical and financial health.

Women’s mental health: The Facts
  • Depression, anxiety, psychological distress, sexual violence, domestic violence and escalating rates of substance use affect women to a greater extent than men across different countries and different settings. Pressures created by their multiple roles, gender discrimination and associated factors of poverty, hunger, malnutrition, overwork, domestic violence and sexual abuse, combine to account for women’s poor mental health.

My Story 

  • Mental health is an issue close to my heart and played a big part in my decision to launch this campaign. I suffered a terrible car accident and injured my back. I was very limited and this caused depression and an inability to deal with my situation. I was put on Prozac and strong painkillers. While I didn’t feel my pain, my mind and ability to think was suppressed. The more I complained, the stronger the painkillers I was prescribed. After two years and many visits to hospitals I was told by my GP that now I had to learn to live with my condition. There was nothing more that could be done. I had the best GP who had been my doctor since I was 17. I had full faith in her.
  • I was referred to a mental health clinic and because of the stigma that’s associated with admitting depression and mental ill-health I was terrified. All my life, as long I was physically able I never thought there was a need to take care of my mental health. It was a wake-up call – I could either stay in this situation or find out more about my mental health and how to take care of it.
  • I started to research. Every day I learned something new about my mental health and how to take care of it. I realised the reason I had become so ill and depressed was because I was not taking care of my mind. Had I done that, I could have dealt with my physical injury in a wholly different way. That would have helped heal me and restore normality to my life. Had I understood mental health, I would have gone to see a psychologist without the fear of being labelled as mentally-ill person. My lack of understanding of this area took away six years of my life, time I’ll never get back. My children were forced to grow up too fast.
  • By helping vulnerable women get stronger through education and awareness, as well as enabling them to have dignity while at their lowest points in life, Billion Women is a charity that hopes to make a real difference in enabling women to take control of their lives. I’m delighted to be able to promote our message on this really important day in the women’s calendar, International Women’s Day, marking equality and empowerment for women around the world.
Mani Kaur Bajwa  – Founder Billion Women  

Let’s Talk – ‘Prevention First’.

Mental health problems are a growing public health concern. They are prevalent not just in the UK, but around the world. Overall rates of psychiatric disorder are almost identical for men and women but striking gender differences are found in the patterns of mental illness.  

Women’s mental health: The Facts

Depression, anxiety, psychological distress, sexual violence, domestic violence and escalating rates of substance use affect women to a greater extent than men across different countries and different settings. Pressures created by their multiple roles, gender discrimination and associated factors of poverty, hunger, malnutrition, overwork, domestic violence and sexual abuse, combine to account for women’s poor mental health. There is a positive relationship between the frequency and severity of such social factors and the frequency and severity of mental health problems in women. Severe life events that cause a sense of loss, inferiority, humiliation or entrapment can predict depression. #mentalhealth #WHO #preventionfirst #selfcare #billionwomen
  • Read More;
  • http://www.time-to-change.org.uk/mental-health-and-stigma
  • Mind –     http://www.mind.org.uk/
  • WHO – http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs220/en/
  • https://www.rethink.org/living-with-mental-illness/wellbeing-physical-health
   

What is Financial Health?

Maintaining good financial health.

Financial health is a term used to describe the state of one’s personal financial situation. Better pay and education are helping women to become a more powerful economic force. That’s a good thing. But that doesn’t mean women don’t face special financial challenges. https://www.gov.uk/guidance/maintaining-good-financial-health  
  • Women live longer, earn less and take more breaks from the workplace to care for children and elderly parents. And though studies show that women tend to save a slightly higher percentage of their paychecks then men, they ultimately end up with smaller balances because of their lower earnings.
  • Though the wage gap is closing, a lifetime of depressed wages means that women will earn about two-thirds what men will. If the pay difference continues to close at a slow pace, working women will not earn as much as working men until 2058.
  • Here are some factors that have a fundamental impact on women’s financial health;
  • Women are more likely to face gaps in employment
  • Women have lower savings levels
  • Women expect to live longer
 
  • Women are not earning as much as men
  • Women pay more for healthcare
  • Women will pay more in taxes
 
  • Three quick steps to find out your financial health – https://financialplanning.hsbc.co.uk/tool/800/financial-health-check
  • We’d like to hear from you if you have any questions, comments
 

Physical Health

A clear distinction is often made between ‘€˜mind’€™ and ‘€˜body’™. But when considering mental health and physical health, the two should not be thought of as separate. Physical and mental health are inextricably linked and it is detrimental to a person’s overall wellbeing to regard these as two separate entities. There is strong evidence that having a long term mental health condition can be a significant risk factor for the development of physical ill health . Conversely long term physical health conditions can lead to people suffering poor mental health. This is mostly due to physical health problems which are often not diagnosed or managed efficiently and lifestyle factors which negatively affect physical health. Physical health is the most visible of the various dimensions of health, which also include social, intellectual, emotional, spiritual and environmental health. Some of the most obvious and serious signs that we are unhealthy appear physically. Poor physical health can lead to an increased risk of developing mental health problems. Similarly, poor mental health can negatively impact on physical health, leading to an increased risk of some conditions. There is an increasing call on healthcare professionals to consider psychological wellbeing when treating the physical symptoms of a condition and vice versa. here are various ways in which poor mental health has been shown to be detrimental to physical health.

Depression has been linked to:

  • 67% increased risk of death from heart disease
  • 50% increased risk of death from cancer.
While schizophrenia is associated with:
  • double the risk of death from heart disease
  • three times the risk of death from respiratory disease.
This is because people with mental health conditions are less likely to receive the physical healthcare they’re entitled to. Mental health service users are statistically less likely to receive the routine checks (like blood pressure, weight and cholesterol) that might detect symptoms of these physical health conditions earlier. They are also not as likely to be offered help to give up smoking, reduce alcohol consumption and make positive adjustments to their diet.
  • Read More ;
  • https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/physical-healthcare-for-people-with-mental-health-problems
  • https://www.rethink.org/living-with-mental-illness/wellbeing-physical-health
  • https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/a-to-z/p/physical-health-and-mental-health